Borrow this book if you have to!

Borrow the information inside of the book if you are smart!

And make it yours if you are wise!

            According to futurist, author and speaker Harry Dent, our information revolution cycles through about every 500 years. Five hundred years ago Guttenberg created the printing press, which changed everything. Today, 500 years later we now have the Internet. The Internet is a newer very popular technology that people are using to communicate. However, the Internet won’t just be used as a medium for old high school friends who haven’t seen each other in a few decades to reach back out to each other. The Internet is being used to massively change the way we do business and make money.

In many ways the Internet has leveled the playing field, removed the gate keepers, and made small businesses and the customer much bigger than they used to be. Dent says the Internet is changing our old ways of doing business from the top down bureaucratic way to more of a customer driven way. Small businesses being small, quick and nimble actually have an edge here in changing and meeting the customers’ needs. The old big businesses need a lot of room and time to turn their very large ship around in order to head in a new direction.

Dent also explains how about every two generations or about every 80 years there is a drastic shift in the way we do business through whatever new technologies that generation ushers in. Today, most of our Fortune 500 companies came from the Roaring 20s generation of Henry Ford, which was about 80 years ago. So, it’s now about 80 years later and it looks like some of the big boys may soon be falling.

The time is right for a new shift in how we do things. The Internet will take over many of or left-brain functions and the new dominating force will become people who have developed their creative, innovative, out-of-the-box, problem-solving right brain thinking. The entrepreneurial spirit will move forward over the next 80 years. We’re already seeing it, in that even simple blue collar jobs, like carpenters, are now running their own YouTube channel where they are giving away free “how-to- fix-it” information in this new Internet Information Age. And big businesses are paying them some good money to advertise on their YouTube channel. Pretty creative, huh? Pretty entrepreneurial? Wouldn’t you agree?

Dent, the futurist, and author of this book, The Roaring 2000s explains how most of us already understand that those who take risks are usually the ones who get rich. What many don’t understand is that successful people don’t really see it as a risk at all. They don’t even see it as a calculated risk, like the luckier ones of us do. The successful new trend setters see it only as an obvious change, not a risk at all. In addition, these successful ones have a plan and have the discipline to stick with their plan over the long term. The ones that fail and go broke are usually the ones that erroneously thought they were going to get rich overnight. Most of the rest of us, just stay put because we’re afraid to lose the little bit of money that we have.

Finally, Dent also says that we are getting ready for a massive transportation revolution… Maybe we can capitalize on this information somehow… After all, we are now in the Information Age… Dent also says that we are having a major advance in human psychology and development where for the first time in history, a massive number of people are moving into Maslow’s self-esteem stage of development, while a strong minority are moving toward self-actualization.

Do you know where you stand in Maslow’s hierarchy? Do you know how you’re going to capitalize on these major shifts of the Internet, information, travel, and right-brain thinking? Some do. To them it’s just an obvious change in what they have to do. For the rest of us, maybe we can begin our new 21st Century journey by reading Harry Dent’s book, The Roaring 2000s. Hopefully, this will give us a few ideas of our own in what the future will hold and how we will make our own obvious shifts in our own behaviors.